Wishing Everyone a Happy Summer Holiday...................Autumn start back on Wednesday 6th September Week 1

Maths and My Family

Numeracy : Maths and My Family

Why is it important?

 

Maths is everywhere. It’s in everything we do. Numeracy – or ‘everyday maths’ – isn’t just about classroom sums. Being numerate is a life skill that will help your child in many ways, at home, at school, and one day, at work too. Try the resource "Essentials of numeracy" at the foot of this page.

“Perhaps the single most important thing that parents can do to help their children with maths is to pass on a positive attitude.”

(Tanya Byron, clinical psychologist, professor in public understanding of science)

 

Top Tips

 

  1. Don’t say things like ‘I can’t do maths’ or ‘I hated maths at school’… your child might start to think like that themselves…
  2. Praise effort – this shows that by working hard they can always improve.
  3. Do talk about the maths in everyday life, and ask your child how they work out problems or questions.
  4. Do let your child enjoy talking about what they’ve learned, and praise them when they try hard.
  5. Don’t put pressure on your child to do written or timed sums.
  6. Do try out the National Numeracy Challenge yourself – the more confident you feel, the more you’ll be able to help your child.

 

Think it ......

Estimate - ask your child to guess how much your shopping will cost, or how much more food you'll need if extra people come for tea.

Solve problems - three extra people are coming to tea, but we only have two extra chairs; how many more do we need?

Plan - discuss journey planning including costs. How much petrol will you need? How can you get the best deal on bus/train tickets?

Talk it ......

Include your child in everyday activities where you use maths - handling money, shopping, cooking, travelling by car or bus.

Talk about time. For instance how long will it take to walk to school. Explain that it's all part of maths.

Get counting crazy! Get your child to count bigger and bigger amounts.

Play it ......

Play games with cards - players take two cards and add them together. The largest number wins. You can play this with subtraction, multiplication and division too.

Sing counting songs. Read books, play games, watch TV and films about maths.

See it ......

Go on a shape hunt - how many circles, triangles, squares and rectangles can you see in everyday objects? You can look for patterns too.

Look for numbers ... on doors, cars, buses, signs, advertisements, sports scores... anywhere. Talk about what the numbers mean.

Touch it ......

Play with things like shells, beads, bottle tops, lego, and compare them. These things are great for making patterns too.

Put things in order of weight, height size etc. Ask your child to help you organise things at home.